Ärgre dich, o Seele, nicht, BWV 186 FREE CONCERT December 14th at 5:30

Join us tomorrow for a FREE Concert starting at 5:30pm on December 14th.

Ärgre dich, o Seele, nicht (Do not be confounded, o soul), BWV 186, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it originally in Weimar in 1716 for AdventBWV 186a, and expanded it in Leipzig in 1723 for the seventh Sunday after Trinity, where he first performed it on 11 July 1723.

The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle to the Corinthians, the ministry of faithful apostles (1 Corinthians 4:1–5), and from the Gospel of MatthewJohn the Baptist in prison (Matthew 11:2–10). The cantata is based on a cantata text written by Salomo Franck for the Third Sunday of Advent, published in Evangelische Sonn- und Fest-Tages-Andachten in 1717. His lyrics contained movements 1, 3, 5, 8, 10 of the later work and a different closing chorale of Ludwig Helmbold. Bach composed the music, BWV 186a, in 1716 in Weimar, where he first performed it on 13 December 1716.

The opening chorus is in rondo form, A B A B A. Section A treats the first line of the poem, section B lines 2 to 4. Section A is a complex combination of instrumental and vocal composition. The instruments open with a sinfonia of 8 measures, followed by a short vocal “Devise” (statement) which is repeated by the orchestra, and only then a fugal development begins, the vocal parts sometimes embedded in material from the sinfonia. The first repeat of section A is shortened in the sinfonia, the second repeat starts with the fugal part right away. In great contrast section B is seta cappella (only accompanied by the continuo) and partly homophonic.

The scoring of the four arias shows increasing complexity and also a rise from the lowest voice to the higher one, soprano and alto coming in only in the second part. The first aria is accompanied only by the continuo, the two next ones in a trio setting, and the final aria is a duet with orchestra. It resembles a Gigue, and the voices, saying “Laß, Seele, kein Leiden von Jesu dich scheiden” (“My soul, let no sorrow separate you from Jesus”), illustrate the meaning by mostly parallel movement.

The four recitatives all end as an arioso.

The chorale movements 6 and 11, ending the two parts of the cantata, are the same music, a chorale fantasia. The chorale is embedded in a concerto of the orchestra, the cantus firmus is given to the soprano, whereas the lower voices sing counterpoint in faster movement, sometimes in imitation.

 

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Wachet! betet! betet! wachet! BWV 70 – FREE Concert

SATURDAY DECEMBER 7TH AT, 5:30pm at Trinity Mission Campus – Free!
One on a part performances
Trinity Chamber Artists

Wachet! betet! betet! wachet! (Watch! Pray! Pray! Watch!) is the title of two church cantatas written by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed a first version, BWV 70a, in Weimar for the second Sunday in Advent of 1716 and expanded it in 1723 in Leipzig to BWV 70, a cantata in two parts for the 26th Sunday after Trinity.

History and Words

On 2 March 1714 Bach was appointed concertmaster of the Weimar court capelle of the co-reigning dukes Wilhelm Ernst and Ernst August of Saxe-Weimar. As concertmaster, he assumed the principal responsibility for composing new works, specifically cantatas for the Schloßkirche (palace church), on a monthly schedule. Bach wrote the cantata originally in his last year there, for the Second Sunday of Advent, and first performed it on 6 December 1716.

The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Epistle to the Romans, call of the Gentiles (Romans 15:4–13), and from the Gospel of Luke, the Second Coming of Christ, also called Second Advent (Luke 21:25–36). The cantata text was provided by the court poet Salomon Franck, published in Evangelische Sonn- und Fest-Tages-Andachten in 1717. Bach wrote five movements, a chorus and four arias, and concluded with the fifth verse of the chorale “Meinen Jesum laß ich nicht” by Christian Keymann.

In Leipzig, Advent was a quiet time (tempus clausum), thus no cantata music was performed in services from Advent II to Advent IV. In order to use the music again, Bach had to dedicate it to a different liturgical event and chose the 26th Sunday after Trinity with a similar theme. The prescribed readings for this Sunday were from the The Second Epistle of Peter, “look for new heavens and a new earth” (2 Peter 3:3–13), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the Second Coming of Christ, also called Second Advent (Matthew 25:31–46). An unknown poet kept the existing movements and added recitatives and a chorale to end part 1 of the new cantata, the final verse of “Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele” by Christoph Demantius.Bach performed the extended cantata first on 21 November 1723, and a second time on 18 November 1731.

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History of Brahms

History of Brahms

  • During his teenage years, Brahms had long fair hair, stunning blue eyes, slender body, and a high voice; he could easily be mistaken for a girl.
  • Brahms was given an honorable grave site next to Beethoven and Schubert; two composers he greatly admired.
  • Brahms never married, but loved many women; so much to the point, that he had to deny one woman piano lessons, because he was greatly attracted to her.

Brahms Family Background:

Johannes was the second child born to Johanna Henrika Christiane Nissen and Johann Jakob Brahms. His father learned to play several instruments, and earned a living playing in local dance halls. His mother was a skilled seamstress. Brahms’ parents married in 1830. His father was 24 and his mother was 41. Besides the fact that their finances were extremely tight, their age difference greatly influenced Johannes’ father to leave his wife in 1864. Brahms had an older sister and a younger brother.

Childhood:

Brahms studied mathematics, history, English, French, and Latin in private elementary and secondary schools. Once Brahms learned to read, he couldn’t stop. His well-used library of over 800 books can now be seen in the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Vienna. Brahms was given lessons on cello, piano, and horn. At the age of seven, he was taught piano by Otto Friedrich Willibald Cossel and within a few years was accepted (free of charge) into the instruction of piano and theory by Eduard Marxen.

Teenage Years:

Much of Brahms’ time was devoted to reading, learning, and composing music. He developed a love for folklore including poems, tales, and music. In his early teens he started to compile a notebook of English folk songs. In 1852, Brahms, inspired by a genuine Minnelied poem by Count Kraft von Toggenburg, wrote the F sharp Piano Sonata op. 2. In 1848, Brahms became familiar with the mixing of Hungarian style and Gypsy style of music, hongrios; later apparent in his Hungarian dances.

Early Adult Years:

Brahms, along with his friend Reményi, toured northern Germany from April to June in 1853. While touring he met Joseph Joachim, who later became his lifelong friend, in Göttingen. He also met Liszt and other prominent musicians. After the tour, Brahms went back to Göttingen to stay with Joseph. Joseph encouraged him to go meet more prominent musicians, especially the Schumanns. Brahms met the Schumanns on September 30, and became very much a part of their family.

Mid Adult Years:

In the 1860’s, Brahms’ style of music, apparent throughout the rest of his career, became more mature and refined. While in Vienna, Brahms met with Wagner. They listened to each others music, and afterward Wagner was known to criticize Brahms’ works; although Brahms’ claimed to be a Wagner supporter. Brahms spent the latter portion of the 1860’s touring much of Europe to earn money. In 1865, after the death of his mother, he began writing the German Requiem and finished a year later.

Late Adult Years:

As a result of his travels, Brahms was able to collect an abundance of music scores autographed by the composers that wrote them. Because of his large circle of musical friends, he was able to give concerts all over Europe. His music and fame spread from Europe to America. After the death of Clara Schumann, he wrote his final pieces. A year later, Brahms was diagnosed with liver cancer. A month before his death, he was able to attend a performance of his 4th Symphony by the Vienna Philharmonic.

Selected Works by Brahms:

Hungarian Dances

  • No. 1 – g minor – 1873
  • No. 3 – F Major – 1873
  • No. 10 – F Major – 1873

Symphonic Works

  • Symphony No. 1 – c minor – 1862-76
  • Symphony No. 2 – D Major – 1877
  • Symphony No. 3 – F Major – 1883
  • Symphony No. 4 – e minor – 1884-5

Solo Piano

  • Sonata No. 1 – C Major – 1852-3
  • Sonata No. 2 – f sharp mionr – 1852
  • Sonata No. 3 – f minor – 1853
  • Scherzo – e flat minor – 1851
  • Variations on a Theme by R. Schumann – f minor – 1854
  • Variations on a Theme by Paganini – a minor – 1862-3

Choral Works

  • Ein Deutches Requiem – 1865-8
  • Ave Maria – 1858
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Saturday afternoon at 5:30, we will be performing Bach’s Cantata BWV 106

This weekend Music and the Arts at Trinity Lutheran Church in Mission celebrates All Saints’ with two very special performances.

First on Saturday afternoon at 5:30, we will be performing Bach’s Cantata BWV 106 – Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit (God’s Own Time Is the Very Best of Times) which remains one of Bach’s most touching pieces in the 200 + cantata output. There is no admission charge, though donations are welcomed.

The professional Trinity Chamber Artists will be performing the Brahms Requiem (London Version) on Sunday afternoon at 4 pm. The Chamber Artists’ captivating pure sound gives intimate, delicate, and personal voice to this piano four-hands version of what is perhaps the composer’s most personal work. This exquisite version of his Requiem allows Brahms’s craftsmanship to shine through with clarity, exposing layers of nuance that may be hidden by the full orchestra.

Anna Myeong and Ellen Bottorff, piano Sarah Anderson, soprano Chris Thompson, baritone Ben A. Spalding, conductor Tickets at the door – $15 General Admission

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Brahms Ein Deutsches Requiem (London Version for piano four hands)

Sunday, November 3, 2013, 4:00 pm

Brahms

The Trinity Chamber Artists pure sound gives intimate, delicate, and personal voice to this piano four-hands version of what is perhaps the composer’s most personal work. This exquisite version of his Requiem allows Brahms’s craftsmanship to shine through with clarity, exposing layers of nuance that are sometimes hidden by the full orchestra.

Anna Myeong and Ellen Bottorff, piano
Sarah Anderson, soprano
Chris Thompson, baritone
Ben A. Spalding, conductor

Visit http://www.tlcms.org/MusicandtheArts  for more information.

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Music and the Arts: Trinity Lutheran Church announces the start seasonal Bach Cantata Series

Bach Cantata Series:

Music and the Arts Trinity Lutheran Church announces the start of our seasonal Bach Cantata Series. This is the FIRST opportunity in the Midwest Region to perform all of Bach’s Sacred Cantatas over the next several years in the liturgical context for which they were written. These FREE, 45-minute services are performed at 5:30 p.m. every Saturday in November, December (except Dec. 28), February, March and April. The cantatas are being performed “one on a part” by the Trinity Chamber Artists.  Series begins Saturday, October 26.  Visit http://www.tlcms.org/MusicandtheArts  for more information.

bach contana


Saturdays, 5:30pm at Trinity Mission Campus – Free!
One on a part performances
Trinity Chamber Artists
Ben A. Spalding, conductor

October 26
Reformation

BWV 79 – Gott der Herr ist Sonn und Schild
God the Lord is sun and shield

November 2
A Celebration of All Saints

BWV 106 – Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit
God’s Own Time Is The Very Best Of Times

November 9
BWV 137 – Lobe den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren
Praise the Lord, the mighty King of honour

November 16
BWV 116 – Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ
Thou Prince of Peace, Lord Jesus Christ

November 23
Christ the King

BWV 76 – Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes
The heavens declare the glory of God

November 30
Advent One

BWV 61 – Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland
Come now, Saviour of the gentiles

December 7
Advent Two

BWV 70 – Wachet! betet! betet! wachet!
Watch! Pray! Pray! Watch!

December 14
Advent Three

BWV 186 – Ärgre dich, o Seele, nicht
Fret not, O soul

December 21
Advent Four

Handel’s Messiah Concert Preview
5:30 pm

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